DESCRIPTION OF THE PROJECT

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With the expansion of regional and national economies into a global marketplace, education has critical importance as a primary factor in allowing young adults to enter the workforce and advance economically, as well as to share in the social, health, and other benefits associated with education and productive careers. The quality of education is considered in all Member States to be a concern of the highest political priority. High levels of knowledge, competencies and skills are considered to be the very basic conditions for active citizenship, employment and social cohesion. Through the adoption of the Lisbon Strategy in 2000, the EU and its Member States equipped themselves with a framework to address poverty and deprivation. Specific attention was given to child poverty and child well­being, with some EU Member States setting explicit targets within set timeframes. More recently, the EU has proposed an ‘inclusive growth’ strand in the Europe 2020 Strategy. The accent on inclusion provides a further opportunity to adopt a comprehensive EU approach to achieving well­being for children, including the most marginalized such as the Roma.

More than 12 million Roma people live in the EU, according to the latest studies (more than one million in Spain, more than 200.000 in Italy etc.), making them the largest minority group in Europe. They are the most discriminated and socially excluded group, especially in accessing education, employment, healthcare and housing. The lack of education among Roma is one of main causes of their current situation: few Roma children and young people go to school and their educational performance is poor, which subsequently worsens their employment opportunities. Across Europe discrimination and non­inclusive school systems systematically deprive children from Roma communities of their right to education.

The project will explore the situation of Roma students and their parents inclusion in the consortium’s nations, the problems with which they face: it will outline the policies implemented at national and EU level; it will highlight how to take effective measures to ensure equal treatment and full access for Roma boys and girls to quality and mainstream education and it will create and test an inclusive and tailor­made model about teaching and learning methods, including learning support for struggling learners and measures to fight illiteracy. The model will increase the access to, and quality of, students’ education and care; reduce early school leaving throughout all levels of education, including at secondary level and vocational training; consider the needs of individual pupils and address those accordingly, in close cooperation with their families; encourage greater parental involvement.

In order to achieve its aims the project partners will use a bottom up approach, based on their direct experiences in the field in order to develop best practice based strategies to answer to the identified problems and establish a fruitful cooperation among all of the subjects playing a role. We’ll design a model of intervention that foster the integration of this collective group, and we’ll realize: didactic laboratories; practical activities; Workshops and Roundtables on Improving Roma Collective Awareness in Education and exploring the problem of Roma failure and dropping out; a guide about “Practice What You Preach: innovative didactic and guidance methodologies Roma students and their parents inclusion in Educational Systems”; a guide about “Roma’s school failure and dropping out: A School for tomorrow’s Europe”.With the expansion of regional and national economies into a global marketplace, education has critical importance as a primary factor in allowing young adults to enter the workforce and advance economically, as well as to share in the social, health, and other benefits associated with education and productive careers. The quality of education is considered in all Member States to be a concern of the highest political priority. High levels of knowledge, competencies and skills are considered to be the very basic conditions for active citizenship, employment and social cohesion. Through the adoption of the Lisbon Strategy in 2000, the EU and its Member States equipped themselves with a framework to address poverty and deprivation. Specific attention was given to child poverty and child well­being, with some EU Member States setting explicit targets within set timeframes. More recently, the EU has proposed an ‘inclusive growth’ strand in the Europe 2020 Strategy. The accent on inclusion provides a further opportunity to adopt a comprehensive EU approach to achieving well­being for children, including the most marginalized such as the Roma.

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